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iran is building another nuclear facility. who is making the claim and what the u.s. government has to say about it. live at the pentagon. number two, more trouble for texas and beyond. first the flooding and now funnel clouds in the mix. in box no. three here is one for you. the sheriffs want to take a peek at your private medical records and know what you are taking to better enforce laws. they say it is for your safety. is it constitutional? judge andrew napolitano weighs in. that is all ahead unless breaking news changes everything on studio b. the labor department releasing what appears to be some very encouraging news on the economy. we are told a number of new folks who filed for jobless benefits fell to the lowest level in a couple of months. encouraging sign for millions of unemployed americans but this is about politics as much as it is economics apparently and the president is now acknowledging this a political headache for his party. how are investors reacting? giving up some gains made earlier in the day. a dip to almost even 15-20 minutes ago. maybe ground being made u
street especially as we head into the november reelection. also joining us, reid wilson will look at candidates supported by the party and their success rate. our last segment, brian powell looking at the definition of a family and the acceptance of same-sex couples and unmarried couples as a definition of family. that will be tomorrow on "washington journal" plus your phone calls and a look at the papers. it starts at 7:00 a.m. we will see you then. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . >> and after that, a confirmation hearing for jacob lew, president obama's choice to head the white house budget office. >> the conflict between the first amendment and national security "necessary secrets" author, this weekend on book tv. >> every weekend on c-span3, experience american history tv, 48 hours of people and events, telling the american story. hear historic speeches by national leaders and eyewitness accounts of events that shaped our nation. visit museums, historical sites and college campuses as professors
probably knows more about these issues than many of us combined. he will be joining us. >> the aclu and the drug policy alliance are advocating for federal legislative change. my coalition co-chair will be talking about litigation and state reforms. i am going to focus on the federal and legislative response, some of the history, and details about what i am talking about today. the aclu were some federal disenfranchisement from three angles. we litigate in court, will lobby in federal and state legislatures, and we engage in public education. as we face another important election, there are an estimated 5.3 million americans who will not be able to vote because of the result of criminal convictions. this is despite the fact that the supreme court repeatedly has said that voting is a fundamental right. most with criminal convictions are barred from the polls. 48 out of 50 states have laws that bar citizens with criminal convictions from bidding in some manner. two other states permanently in franchise criminals with felony convictions. there are 5.3 million americans who cannot vote.
it's time for chuck and savannah. >>> hot stir, flamed fanner. iran's president blames us for 9/11 and the u.s. delegation heads for the exits. it's iranian president feeling the pressure today. >>> prescription for trouble. the government warns some of the most abused pills could be in your home. but says maybe you shouldn't just throw them out. >>> and sex, lies, and baseball. the fate of the los angeles dodgers could be decided today in divorce court. good morning. it's friday, september 24th, 2010. i'm savannah guthrie. >> i have to say dodgers thing is a thing i am most focused on as a dodger fan. i'm chuck todd. start in new york where iranian president ahmadinejad claimed that parts of the u.s. government somehow orchestrated the 9/11 attacks. watch. >> translator: some segments within the u.s. government orchestrated the attack to reverse the declining american economy and it scripts on the middle east in order to save the zionist regime. >> that prompted the american delegation to walk out, and then the british delegation and several from the european union. of course,
not trust us, they will not keep coming back. continue >> and a month-long look at privacy in communications policy. >> the c-span video library is a great resource to see what is happening in washington. find the most recent events covered, those most watched, and most covered -- all free. >> governor tim pawlenty is widely considered to be contemplating a presidential run in 2012. he recently sat down with c-span to talk about his plans for the future. this is just under 40 minutes. >> has there been a defining moment for you as governor of minnesota? >> probably many, but i will give you two. one is the support we have given to the men and women in a national -- national military, and the national guard. we have stepped up in unprecedented ways to support them. we lead the nation in the beyond the yellow ribbon campaign. the other thing, for minnesota, i am in stick it has been liberal through history, and for me to draw a line on driving down government spending and will be on cutting taxes is something i'm also proud of. >> the president has said that next year in july 2011, it is a tra
that city officials were raking in huge salaries. >> the complaint alleges they used the tax dollars collected from the hard-working citizens of bell as their own piggy bank. >> shepard: now the bell, california eight face a judge. and this woman is slated to die tomorrow for organizing two murders. supporters say her sentence is unfair but they are running out of time. tonight, fighting death in virginia. but first from fox this wednesday night, those reports of deep division within the white house about the afghan war. the details come from a book by bob woodward. the man who helped blow open the watergate scandal. now in obama's wars, woodward writes that. so president's top advisors tried to undermine each other as they debated the afghan strategy. the president set a withdrawal plan because he said, quote, i can't lose the whole democratic party. but there is word even the president's special representative for the region didn't believe the war strategy. the "new york times" reports the book quotes richard holbrooke as saying "it can't work." the book's other details of disagre
, a look at the u.s. foster care system. daniel heimpel joins us. this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] host: good morning, and welcome to "washington journal" for wednesday, september 27, 2010. president obama travels to new york for the u.n. general assembly. he will talk health care reform at a back yard reception in virginia s and meet with insurance commissioners and this evening, a democratic fund- raiser. the house returns to washington for a few days of business and the senate continues work. yesterday it did not move for the defense authorization bill and overturning "don't ask, don't tell." a ban on gays openly serving in the military. top story today, a new book by bob woodward about inside the white house. but with the president and his top military advisers and recounts a tough decision on whether to build up true spirit that is our topic this morning. you can give us a call and way and -- we are also on line. and you can find us on twitter. the top story and "the washington
of using his authority to coerce two young men into having sex. the young men claim they were then given lavish trips, cars and even cash. they are now suing long, who is pastor of one of the nation's biggest baptist churches. >>> a man from western new york is on his way back to north carolina, charged with killing a police chief's daughter. michael harvey appeared before a judge in new york yesterday. harry very reportedly told police valerie hamilton died after an accidental overdose of heroin. at a church in her hometown outside charlotte. >>> eight city officials from bell, california, are due in court this morning on corruption charges. they're accused of paying themselves huge salaries in a scandal that triggered outrange far beyond california. here now is mike von fremd. >> reporter: a rauk does crowd gathered outside city hall as word spread that officials were being rounded up and arrested. one even had his door broken down by a police battering ram. >> they used the tax dollars collected from the hard-working citizens of bell as their own piggy bank, which they then looted at
beginning to end. you go from phase one and as soon as you think your body's got used to it, boom, he switches it to phase two and then to phase three. you just have these three-week intervals and then a week of break in between and then you come back. you just feel stronger than ever and it's, uh, he's just thought it all out. it's like he's invented the wheel of fitness and there's no reason to try and reinvent this wheel because it works. [♪...] ...i used to only be able to do like two of these. now they're my favorite. it's not easy by any means but if you commit to it, the way that you feel after each workout is amazing 'cause you feel like you've just conquered the world and you're excited to even go back and do it the next time. the proof is right there. you do the workouts, you get it done, it's the body of your life and don't try and convince yourself it's not what you want because anybody that gets here will never look back and say i didn't want to be there. you want this, so then get it done. >> announcer: this guy got it done. she got it done. he got it done. and on and
get a ticket, never talk or text while driving, respect the privilege of using your car, and never n signed by you, jonathan. i think that's so great. you did this because of the loss of derek? >> yeah, yeah. one--one thing we were paranoid about was jonathan driving. and jonathan even had a hard time driving after that. so i just felt that on his honor, if he signed the contract, he would obey those laws. >> that's amazing. oprah: yeah. so you were the first no phone zone. >> yes. yes. oprah: yeah. you were a no phone zone before we did. >> you know, i have--yeah. i have to tell you, i--you know, you always have that moment when you're on television about whether or not you're going to share something that's so personal. and there's always that moment where you can make that decision to do it oprah: or not to. >> or toh: you say, "do i cr oprah: you say, "do i crack myself open for the world?" >> right, exactly. do i crack myself open for the world? and if i do, why? what can come of it? and so, i'm so sorry for your loss, and i know that grief is not a straight path. i know it's li
" reporter andrew zajac. and a discussion on the u.s. labor market with economist j. bradford delong. this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] caller: caller: caller: caller: caller: host: general petraeus, secretary clayton -- glenn beck, among others, agreed that the dove out of reach center should not burn at the koran on the anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks. now we want your opinion whether you see it as a free-speech issue or not. you can see the numbers on the screen this morning. for the first 45 minutes we will be talking about this and going through the newspapers. you can also send us a tweak to -- tweet, tweet certification.com -- twitter.com/c-span-wj. here are a couple of articles about this. it has become headlines everywhere. u.s. embassies brace for karan burning protests. this is from the associated press. governor andate's u.s. embassies around the world preparing. from "the washington examiner" newspaper here in washington -- again, that is in "the washington
have to give us adequate time to get to the floor so we can respond to the bills and i am recognized and am making a statement because i'm really upset. this is the way the majority has been running the congress, mr. speaker. . you wonder why the american people are upset with majority is because of this. if you don't give adequate notice to the ranking member to be to the floor on bills, people are going to know. you know they are going to know? because i'm going to tell the story. rules matter around this place. now, let me go back to the first bill. the only reason i want to mention this is because i want to thank, you just passed it, we are going to do it by voice, let me tell you what's upsetting. it's the parliamentarian. from the time you drop that bill and the parliamentarian makes sure it gets to the jurisdictions. some might get amended and some other committee thinks they want a view on it. what happens is the majority not giving a doggone about the minority puts bills on this floor no matter what they do so long it's in comfort with someone else. they don't care about the
in restarting diplomatic relations with the u.s. over the nuclear weapons program. >> i'm optimistic. >> chief of staff rahm emanuel could leave his post next month. that's according to insiders. speculation is he'll run for mayor of chicago now that richard daley will not seek re-election. stay tuned for that. tensions are rising in east jerusalem. the outrage after a palestinian man was shot and killed by an israeli security guard. what effect it will have on the current peace talks is unclear. palestinian leader abbas says he probably won't break off talks with the dispute over the west bank. suspected terrorists nabbed in yemen. government forces launched a major offensive trying to root out a terror cell with 120 militants. officials deny american-born radical cleric is among them. and those are your headlines. >> just look for the guy in the beard and just grab him. that shouldn't be a problem. we have enough photos of himment so yeah, we'll find out what's happening. it's funny we're saying it has nothing to do with him being there. we have a capture and kill on him. it's just coinciden
bowers is in portage, wisconsin to bring us up to date. good morning, cindy. >> reporter: good morning, maggie. this earthen he levee is part of a series of dikes built mostly sand way back in the 1890s. sunday parts began to erode or give way as people in the historic town of portage are seeing the wisconsin river at its highest level since 1938. here in portage, the wisconsin river reached 20.5 feet sunday. that's even higher than the predicted crest, which forecastrs said wouldn't come until later today. 300 residents were asked to evacuate but those who stayed behind were trapped when local highways were shut down. >> they told us that we have -- that we had ten minutes to get out of there because they are blocking off all the roads back there. >> reporter: all this flooding was the result of extraordinarily heavy rains that fell across the upper midwest last week, as much as 10 to 12 inches in some areas. in the western wisconsin town of arcadia, some folks were allowed to return to their homes only to find their belongings water-logged. >> phone calls from a few friends letting m
this is not the end of that. a lot more to go. go more years. that does it for us. i'm eric shawn. >>amie: i'm jamie colby. good to have you with us. we'll send you to washington now, much more news with shannon bream. have a great day and good have a great day and good holiday. t99captioned bypclosed c >> shannon: economic push. president obama is ready to unveil the latest plan to fix the economy. does he have the right prescription? and march to the midterm, if the president can help the economy, will it help the democrats face uphill battle in november? stem cell debate. legal ruling stops funding of embryonic stem cell research. ethics versus scientific process? we have a fair and balanced debate on that coming up. i'm shannon bream. live from the nation's capital starts right now. the obama administration seems eager to talk about the economy, but does america like what it's hearing? mr. obama put a spin on weak job numbers and now he is pushing ideas to spur economic growth. julie kirtz is standing by with more on that. >> reporter: he is going to visit two swing states and
discontent and focus on social crisis. justice.al "u.s. unemployment stands at 9.6%, with michigan at 13.1%. those who do not have jobs are anxious about losing them and watching their benefits declined. incomes are down, and many people are fighting health care expensive or lacking coverage altogether. for many, retirement seems but a dream. the the union is trying to tap into worker discontent and re- commit itself to broader social and justice issues in an effort to rejuvenate its sunken membership level." in "the new york times" there is an article about anna burger. "after all light and labor, a union leader retires, frustrated. she has dedicated her life to building the labor movement but has in nonetheless grown smaller and weaker. beyond a stepping down debt from of federation represents 5 million union members, she is retiring from her job of 14 years as secretary-treasurer of the powerful service employees international union, representing 2 million janitors and other hospital workers. many women have far too hard a time of balancing jobs and family. she is frustrated that unio
minutes november? if you want to weigh in via e-mail as well, you can do so. and if you want to use twitter. again, we take our focus for the 45 minutes for the front page story in the "wall street journal" this morning. taking a look at political story with speaker pelosi. this is out of washington. they write so it talks about the political journey that will take, the paper talks more about that. but for our 45 minutes we're using this as a springboard to hear from democrats only. we'll take e-mail and twitter affouf this question, too. one more section from the interior pages of the same story. the writers write this morning. so the numbers will be on your screen. to your calls looking at speaker pelosi this november. portland, yorle, on -- oregon, on our line who thinks she will help. caller: i think nancy pelosi has been consistent and correct in her political decisions. i think she is definitely good for the country. and we small -- small african american community are very strong supporters. i think that the media is kind of hyped up all the predictions about shrinking democr
: duped by her claims she was viciously attacked with acid by a stranger. police say stroe used donations to pay for clothes, train tickets, an apple computer, even a chemical peel at a doctor's office. >> crying a lot. she's in a lot of pain with the acid being in her face. >> reporter: stroe claimed a stranger attacked her in a public park, throwing the acid in her face. >> i could hear bubbling in my skin. >> reporter: her story seemed suspicious. >> during the interview miss stroe admitted her injuries were self-inflicted. >> reporter: she admitted she'd bought drain cleaner, days later she entered a restroom near the park and rubbed the acid directly on her face. why? she told police the reason she applied the caustic substance was to first kill herself, secondly, to have a completely different face. outside of court, the woman who'd previously plenty to say about her alleged attacks was silent. her face said enough. stroe was released into the care of a psychiatric facility. that's where she'll stay as she awaits her trial. vinita, rob? >>> if you are awake with your newborn and you
thing that caused us to do it. just a deep conviction from god that something has to happen. >> reporter: so he is praying. as are so many other people around the world. i'm terry moran in gainesville, florida. >> now more information's starting to come out about this guy. they said apparently he doesn't know any muslims personally and a lot of what he knows about the religion has come from youtube. a lot of question about who this guy is. >> countering extremism with extremism is what a lot of people are saying. it's interesting. in 2005 there was just a report out that some guards at guantanamo bay flushed a koran, and that incited deadly riots in afghanistan. when you later general david petraeus saying this could really hurt our armed men overseas, it is a worry. >>> coming up after the break, the results of a study on memory loss. >> who is osked more, men or women? you're watching "world n >>> in a new study that proves what women and myself have really known for years, that men are more forgetful. >> not surprised here. the study from the mayo clinic says as men age they are much
to you about well this weekend, i have to go back to mississippi for a family reunion. >> give us a brief idea of what the book is about? >> the book is about the defection of 6 million african-americans from the south to the north, mid-west to the west. from 1915-1970 when the south began truly to change. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this as i went in. i'll read it to you. everyday more migrants are coming no the cities to seek a better life for their children. >> i wrote this book thinking of any country. it's a movie about the last train home where they have 150 million migrant that's live in the city each year. i want to talk to you about what you have written in the front of your book by richard wright. >> who was he and why did you pick him? >> richard wright was one of the greatest novelists of the 20 j century. he was a migrant from mississippi to chicago. he was the son of a share cropper and always wanted to write. i set out in 1927 to get to chicago. he spent almost his entire career. almost everything he wrote had to do with understanding the migrant exper
experience in washington. it was a national outpouring of people. >> just give us a brief synopsis of what the book is about. >> the book is about the migration experiences of three people that have become part of the larger whole, which was the defection of 6 million african americans from the south to the north, to the midwest and west from 1915, world war i until 1970. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this. i want to read it to you. every day, more migrants are coming into the cities to seek a better life for their children. the scale of this massive migration from the poor countryside to the burgeoning cities is unprecedented in human history. the migrants provide a cheap source of labor booming cities and the thriving economy is built on the backs of those citizens. do you have any idea what country that is? >> i am thinking the united states. i wrote this book with the idea that it would refer to almost every immigrant that crossed the atlantic or the pacific ocean in order to come here. >> it is the movie called "the last train home." they had 130 million migrants t
thank you all for putting a face to something that many of us really had no idea was happening in america. well, the beauty of all this is that you're not your past. you get to create from now who you want to be. and you can use your past as a way to strengthen who you want to be. so thank you for sharing your stories. and again, i want to say to everybody, if you think something strange is going on, in your house, in your neighborhood, especially when children are involved, you need to tell somebody. listen to that part of yourself that these girls listened to. and don't stop until you feel you've been heard. thank you all for watching. and remember, make your car a no phone zone. you thought i wasn't going to get it in, but i did. bye, everybody. bye, everybody. [captioning made possible by king world] [captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--] how would i make school a tter place? field trips to the zoo! more basketballs. soccer balls. and a museum! [ growls ] more basketballs. soccer balls! more books. yeah. like just a ton of books. [ g
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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